Do you need an automated acceptance testing framework?

This post is part of the Pride & Paradev series.


Do you need an automated acceptance testing framework?


Yes, you need an automated acceptance testing framework

If you’re starting off with automated acceptance testing and you don’t have some kind of framework, eg, page object models, in place then you can quickly develop a mess. If your automated acceptance tests are being written by various people on your project, then having a framework in place that people can follow will make for the most consistent approach.

There are certain operations that you can abstract to a base page class to ensure consistency across pages, and you can write helper methods for automated test drivers so that the same functionality is being repeated across your code base.

Without some kind of framework in place you’re likely to have various approaches implemented which will eventually cause a maintenance overhead as your automated test suite expands.

No, you don’t need an automated acceptance testing framework

There’s an old saying in extreme programming: YAGNI: you ain’t gonna need it, which means a programmer shouldn’t add functionality until absolutely necessary.

An automated acceptance testing framework violates this principle, there is a strong risk of developing functionality in your framework which you ain’t gonna need.

Over-engineered automated acceptance test frameworks are harmful for a team as they dictate certain ways of doing things which means the team can be less efficient in developing what they need to deliver.

Developing a framework before any functionality is delivered is particularly inefficient, as it is not until you start using a framework you will understand what you require it to do and what it shouldn’t do.

Pair programming on the automated acceptance tests can ensure a consistent approach is taken to development and knowledge across functional areas is shared.

One thought on “Do you need an automated acceptance testing framework?

  1. As someone who is relatively new to mobile automation, these articles are really useful.

    I too have been using Appium, and have a question regarding page object models.

    What POM gem are you using? My tests are in ruby and I am in the process of moving to a pom model but have been running into issues finding a working pom gem.

    I tried https://github.com/leviwilson/furter but seems like there is not enough documentation, and ran into some errors during setup.

    I would be really interested in learning about the pom you use if you do not mind sharing that info.

    Thanks!

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