Improving your agile flow

I’ve noticed two counterforces to flow on an agile team: rework and human multitasking. It’s common knowledge that rework is wasted effort, and human multitasking should be avoided as it reduces velocity through inefficient human context-switching, and can increase further errors through insufficient attention to tasks at hand.

But luckily there’s two simple things I have found that increase flow and reduce rework and multitasking.

User Story Kickoffs

It is essential that just before development work begins on every user story that a kickoff discussion occurs. This is a casual discussion around a computer between the business analyst, tester and any programmer who is working on the user story.

In my experience this takes about ten minutes standing around someone’s desk where we read aloud the acceptance criteria from Trello and discuss any ambiguities. We ensure that everything that is needed for the story to be considered complete and ready for testing is listed and that it’s not too large nor will take too long to complete.

We have special children’s sticker on our story wall which we put onto a story card that has been properly kicked off.

User story test handovers/shoulder checks

shoulder checks are essential
shoulder checks are essential

It’s also essential that as soon as development is complete that the tester and any programmers who worked on the story gather for a quick ‘shoulder check’ or test handover. This often involves letting the tester ‘play’ with the functionality on the programmer’s machine, and running through the now completed Trello acceptance criteria. Any misunderstandings or bugs can be discussed and resolved before the card becomes ready for testing.

We have special children’s sticker on our story wall which are then added to a story card that has been handed over/shoulder checked. The aim is to have two stickers on every story card in ready for test.

How these two simple activities improve flow

By conducting a user story kickoff every time it means that everyone working on developing the functionality has a common understanding of what is required and therefore there is a lot less chance of developing something that is not needed or misunderstood which requires subsequent rework.

By conducting a story test handover/shoulder check every time it means that obvious bugs and misunderstandings are raised immediately, so they can be fixed quickly before the programmer(s) moves onto working on new user stories. If discovered later these cause the programmer to multitask and context-switch between working on bug fixes and new functionality.

But I’m too busy testing stories…

I used to think that, but now I’ve got a personal rule that regardless of what I am doing or working on, I will drop it to attend a story kickoff or test handover. The benefits of me conducting these activities outweigh any work that I need to resume after these activities are complete.

Bonus Time… is it essential your bugs are fixed?

The great thing about agile software development is that developing something and testing something are a lot closer together… but they’re still apart. It’s more efficient to get someone to fix a bug whilst it’s fresh in their memory, but it’s even more efficient to not fix it at all.

What I am proposing is instead of raising medium/minor bugs against a story to be tested, raise them as bugs in the backlog to be prioritized. Depending on your organization, your business may not consider these important enough to fix, and therefore this saves you both rework and context-switching so you can continue on developing new functionality.

2 thoughts on “Improving your agile flow

  1. Very insightful Alister! I liked the idea of shoulder check by showing tester the stuff on programmer’s box. What I have seen also a good practice is programmers and testers discussing with each other (in a friendly talk) about their daily tasks. This is other than the Daily status call and more of sharing a knowledge. Such discussions and more interactions between team members really help in achieving the mission.

    Thanks again for giving two ideas to fight two problems :)

    1. Probably taken further, the shoulder check could involve business stakeholder or client to make sure it’s what they want that’s working too. Especially if this could be done with daily standup that has the stakeholder attending anyhow. But more problematic when there’s a liason for that stakeholder, e.g. a project/product manager that subs for the actual business unit or client.

Comments are closed.